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Types of Anaesthetic

There are a number of different types of anaesthetic and most hysterectomies are performed while the patient is under a full anaesthetic. This will knock you out throughout the operation and you will eventually come round in the recovery room. However, this type of anaesthetic can have side effects which may include nausea and dizziness, an incredible tiredness for several days, not being able to think clearly for at least 24 hours after your surgery.  It can also take several months for the anaesthetic to work its way out of your body completely (drinking plenty of water and taking enough exercise can help this enormously).  Continue reading Types of Anaesthetic

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Hernia after hysterectomy (incisional hernia after hysterectomy)

hernia operation

Hernia after hysterectomy is a relatively uncommon side effect of an abdominal hysterectomy. Also known as an incisional hernia it occurs because the abdominal cut weakens the muscles in the surrounding area. This creates a tender and painful bulge in the muscles surrounding the area. Continue reading Hernia after hysterectomy (incisional hernia after hysterectomy)

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Total vs subtotal hysterectomy for benign gynaecological conditions

A total hysterectomy is one which removes the uterus and the cervix. A subtotal hysterectomy leaves the cervix intact. You can find out more about the various types of hysterectomy here: How is a Hysterectomy Performed? Continue reading Total vs subtotal hysterectomy for benign gynaecological conditions

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Is it any wonder women are confused about ovary conservation at hysterectomy?

I’ve just read a research report that suggests that all women should consider having their ovaries removed when they have a hysterectomy because “women who had their ovaries taken out had lower rates of ovarian cancer and were not more likely to get heart disease or a hip fracture – which had been a worry in this group because of the quick drop in hormones that happens once the ovaries are gone.” The self same report goes on to do a comparison with an earlier piece of research which “found that women who had their ovaries removed were more likely to be diagnosed with heart disease and die than women who didn’t.” Continue reading Is it any wonder women are confused about ovary conservation at hysterectomy?

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Chances Of Getting Cancer May Be Reduced By Hysterectomy

Researchers have suggested that women may be able to create some protection for themselves from gynaecological cancers by having their ovaries and uterus removed, if they have been diagnosed with nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or Lynch syndrome. Continue reading Chances Of Getting Cancer May Be Reduced By Hysterectomy

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Single-incision laparoscopic hysterectomy

There is a new type of hysterectomy currently being tested in the UK which is called SILS.  It is a single-port access surgery, or single-incision laparoscopic surgery.   The vast majority of women in the UK and abroad who have hysterectomies, typically have the traditional, invasive abdominal surgery (Total Abdominal Hysterectomy/Abdominal Hysterectomy). Continue reading Single-incision laparoscopic hysterectomy

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LASH – Laparascopic Supracervical Hysterectomy

Laparoscopic Supracervical Hysterectomy (LSH) is a much less invasive procedure than either abdominal or vaginal hysterectomy that leaves the cervix and its mucous glands in place thus avoiding vaginal dryness which can be one of the most common complaints that women have post hysterectomy. It is thought that the cervix may play a more significant part in women’s experiences of orgasm and sex post hysterectomy than had previously been thought. Continue reading LASH – Laparascopic Supracervical Hysterectomy